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Algae Ethanol: Algenol Realizes 9,000 Gallons Per Acre

algae ethanolAlgae innovator Algenol currently at 50% over initial production goal – seeks to finish trial in 2013, and head for commercial-scale in 2014.

In Florida, Algenol proved that the organization had realized output levels 9,000 gallons of algae ethanol per acre annually – and business CEO Paul Woods said that ” I fully expect our talented scientific team to achieve sustained production rates above 10,000 by the end of this year.”

Only last September, in the beginning plenary session at the Algae Biomass Summit, Woods said that the organization, at its 4-acre, outdoor Process Development Unit in Lee County, Florida, had reached constant output of algae ethanol at the 7,000 gallon per acre rate.

That it was a large improvement over the company’s initial goal of 6,000 gpa, and had been obtained in open-air operation within typical working circumstances.

With the news, Woods verified that the business, right after finishing main engineering tasks at their built-in pilot scale biorefinery in 2012, has entirely changed focus to exhibiting the commercial practicality of Direct to Ethanol engineering at its pilot facility and determining sites for professional initiatives to start in 2014.

Woods added, “Our patented ‘Direct to Ethanol’ technology enables the production of algae ethanol for around $1.00 per gallon using sunlight, carbon dioxide and saltwater. The low production costs are achievable because ‘Direct to Ethanol’ technology produces high yields and relies on our patented photobioreactors and proprietary downstream techniques for the low-cost recovery and purification of ethanol.

“One ton of carbon dioxide (CO2) is converted into 160 gallons of ethanol, and 2 gallons of fresh water are produced for each gallon of ethanol in the ‘Direct to Ethanol’ process.

While preserving a principal focus on ethanol manufacturing, Woods revealed that Algenol had broadened its product profile to incorporate diesel and jet fuel from waste algae.  ”Algae Ethanol will be our main commercial product and jet and diesel will be integrated into our process over the next 2 years. We also continue to monitor opportunities to adapt our algae-based platform technology to produce valuable chemicals, such as propylene-based chemicals.”

The reports from Florida was the initial significant development in the Algenol story since last October, when it was disclosed that Reliance Industries Limited, the Indian petroleum, chemicals, telecom and manufacturing conglomerate, had put in a total of $116 million (Rs6.2 billion) in the algae space – with $93.5 million (Rs5.0 billion) heading to Algenol and 22.5 million (Rs1.2 billion) to Aurora Algae.

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The Algae Revolution Has Begun

California Approves Fuel Made From Algae

California has taken a giant leap forward in mainstreaming algae biofuels by offering it’s approval of a new 20% blend. Last month we saw a successful trial of algae biofuels being sold to consumers at gas stations. This month we see California moving forward and paving the way for successful, wide-spread, distribution.

In Sacramento, California, The Department of Food and Agriculture’s Division of Measurement Standards (DMS) has tested samples of a new 20 percent biodiesel blend fuel made from algae and is happy to report that the fuel is compliant with California’s quality specification for biodiesel blends. The new fuel became available November 13, 2012 at four gas stations in Berkeley, Oakland, Redwood City and San Jose as part of a pilot program.

The algae is not typical pond algae – it is produced specifically to consume sugar and convert it to stored oils that supply energy. The algae is grown in special reaction vessels under very sterile conditions to encourage maximum oil production.

The fuel is 20 percent algae biodiesel blended with low sulfur diesel fuel. Samples were tested to ensure overall high-quality engine performance and to ascertain that exhaust emissions will remain low. The tests were also good indicators that engine deposits and engine wear will be minimal, and that corrosion and filter plugging are reduced – very important factors for fuel used in diesel engines.

When evaluating biodiesel and other fuels, California adheres to standards set by ASTM International and SAE International, which meet the requirements of engine manufacturers worldwide. DMS has a rigorous program of sampling and testing for fuels sold at retail. A 2012 marketplace survey showed 99 percent quality compliance rate in gasoline and 98 percent compliance for diesel.

Persons experiencing problems with quality, quantity or product labeling of fuels or automotive products can contact their local county department of weights and measures or the DMS at 916-229-3000. The DMS website http://www.cdfa.ca.gov/dms/ has additional information about petroleum products as well as an online complaint form and links to county weights and measures offices.

What this means to the rest of us.

Basically, California is stealing the show in terms of setting the stage that the rest of the country will follow. They were the first to establish city zoning areas for algae biofuels, the first to establish guidelines, the first to sell algae biofuels publicly, now the first to grant governmental approval. I would also expect some of the first commercialized algae biofuel production centers to start moving to California as well.

This is both good and bad. It’s no secret that while California is no doubt a leader, it also has its own particular way of doing things. Which sometimes fit, and sometimes doesn’t, with the rest of the country. The various law makers being what they are, tend to look at what one state is doing and if seeing no glaring mistakes, adopt the same rules and regulations without much introspection.

On the other hand, implementation has to start somewhere. California is as good a place as any, and better than most. The legal groundwork has to begin. Beginning sooner is better than beginning later. It doesn’t hurt that California has many natural attributes, both in climate and in infrastructure, which make it an ideal place for algae biofuel start ups.

Everyone knows they can certainly use the tax dollars.

Algae Biodiesel is Available at Gas Stations in California

There’s been a lot of talk lately that algae based biofuels are too expensive and that it could never compete with petroleum. So it came as a shock to find out that this month gas stations in California will be selling algae based diesel to the public. So how much? $100 a gallon? $33 dollars a gallon?

Nope. Same price as regular diesel.

Propel Fuels announced today it is teaming up with Solazyme, Inc and kicking off a month long pilot program bring algae derived biofuels to gas pumps in California. This marks the first time in history that algae based fuels will be available to the public.

Solazyme is rolling out it’s algae based biodiesel in a big way. It is proving once and for all the algae revolution is upon us. “Solazyme’s high quality algae-based SoladieselBD meets or exceeds ASTM quality specifications and has shown performance enhancements including cold temperature operating performance. The fuel is compatible with existing diesel engines and the fuel’s performance is guaranteed by Propel. The fuel will be sold at the same price as conventional diesel fuels and will be available exclusively at Propel’s Clean Fuel Points in Redwood City, San Jose (N. First St.), Berkeley, and Oakland.”

“Solazyme’s high quality algae-based SoladieselBD meets or exceeds ASTM quality specifications and has shown performance enhancements including cold temperature operating performance. The fuel is compatible with existing diesel engines and the fuel’s performance is guaranteed by Propel. The fuel will be sold at the same price as conventional diesel fuels and will be available exclusively at Propel’s Clean Fuel Points in Redwood City, San Jose (N. First St.), Berkeley, and Oakland.”

Not only that, it is as green as it gets. Testing undertaken by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) shows that, in a 20% blend, SoladieselBD significantly outperforms ultra-low sulfur diesel in total hydrocarbons (THC), carbon monoxide (CO) and particulate matter tailpipe emissions. This includes an approximate 30% reduction in particulates, a 20% reduction in CO and an approximate 10% reduction in THC.

Their website went on to say “Solazyme’s revolutionary algae-based technology platform has supplied our development partners and customers with advanced biofuels that meet or exceed some of the world’s most stringent fuels specifications and requirements, “ said Bob Ames, VP of Fuels, Solazyme.  “We’ve successfully demonstrated our land-based fuels in fleet vehicles and corporate buses, and are excited about this pilot program with Propel because it enables us to make these fuels available to the public.”

The Algae Revolution Has Begun

65% of algae producers said they plan to expand capacity in 2012

A new survey of the algae industry conducted by the Algae Biomass Organization (ABO) shows algae companies are increasing production in 2012, they expect to be price-competitive with petroleum fuels by 2020, and that stable and effective Federal policy would accelerate production and job creation.

The survey of more than 380 algae industry contacts shows a rapidly growing sector: 65 percent of algae producers said they plan to expand capacity in 2012 as they work to provide the U.S with new sources of sustainable, domestically produced fuels.

Respondents are optimistic that algae biofuels will be commercially available and competitive with fossil fuels by 2020, with 90 percent believing that it is at least somewhat likely, and nearly 70 percent believing it is moderately to extremely likely. Nearly 20 percent believe fuel will be $1.50 per gallon or lower while nearly 50 percent believe it will be less than $3.00 per gallon by 2020.

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